Archive for the ‘Deep Purple In Rock’ Category

47th anniversary reprint!

June 5, 2017

Deep Purple In Rock

What were you doing on June 5th forty-seven years ago?  Me I was probably trying to dodge flying board rubbers in double english (the teacher had this habit of lobbing them at high velocity in the vague direction of anyone he thought wasn’t paying attention…)
Some however were lucky enough to be in town picking up Deep Purple In Rock, released that day (or perhaps the single Black Night, issued at the same time.)
I was reminded of this only because the reprint of the book Deep Purple – Wait For The Ricochet is at last back in stock at the publishers.  Everyone who pre-ordered the reprint has had their copy shipped, but if you missed it first time round, now is your chance (but don’t dilly dally as a third of the stock has apparently shipped already.)

The book basically covers the entire build up from the first days of Mk 2 through the recording sessions for the first Mk 2 studio album and then the In Rock tour, an intense two year period, researched in remarkable detail, chock full of photos and memorabilia. From Jon Lord’s mum defending her lad in the Melody Maker, to Roger Glover’s hints for dying crushed velvet trousers green. From the location of the gig where Gillan was auditioned, to Ritchie shopping for strobe lights. From the In Rock engineer’s matter of fact description of Ritchie recording the guitar solo for Child In Time,  to Ian Gillan Black Night contemporary press reviewexplaining the need for tight trousers to sing the vocals, it’s all here.  What’s more there is a discount on the retail price which is extended for the next two weeks if you order through the publisher’s shop. The links below will give you more information and page visuals.
And if you already have the book, celebrate like I am by playing a cut or two off the album later today (to get Liar Liar out of your brain if nothing else!).

link to shop
link to publisher’s pages about the book
reviews of the first edition

In Rock book cover, Wait For The Ricochet.

 

 

The Black Sun went down

October 5, 2015

Deep Purple Roger Glover Guildford 1969

Don’t get too excited when we say this is a newly discovered clip of Deep Purple Mk 2, as it is very very short, silent, monochrome and blurry.  But it is always tantilising to see early scenes of this line-up live, just a few weeks after the Royal Albert Hall do.
It’s part of a short 16mm film made to record events at the University of Surrey’s Rag Week, which includes fund raising goodies such as a Mile Of Pennies, girls in bikinis jumping in buckets of water for money (and they reckon the ice bucket challenge was new!), and then on to the week’s big concert on November 28th in Guildford, Deep Purple, supported by Bridget St John, Horse and Quintessence, with the Black Sun Light Show.  Tickets 16/- (or a quid on the door).
The Uni archivists say the soundtrack has been lost and needless to say any unused footage is missing.
Thanks to Dave Browne for spotting it.

Smells like…

September 16, 2015

“Do you know the bewitching power of the poppy? A precious flower, with invaluable vitality. Its bloom conceals a vibrant sensuality, revealing the essence of women, their most captivating facet.”

And here’s me thinking it was used to make Class A drugs.  Still, this new commercial for Kenzo perfume does have one thing going for it;  Deep Purple’s original Child In Time as the backing music.  And it sounds amazing even pulled out of context, testament to what an incredible track it always was.  The manufacturers have also posted a lengthy “making of” video in which they discuss everything from the design of the bottle to the CGI.  But don’t mention the music once.

Our man being sprayed in the face in John Lewis: Tim Summers

SHVL777@45

June 5, 2015

Deep Purple In Rock NME June 13 1970

Unlike famous musicians, who we expect to be able to recall what they did on every day of their career (because we have to know!), I haven’t got the foggiest notion what I was up to on Friday June 5th 1970, beyond getting through another day at school.  Friday was usually sports all afternoon, an occupation I loathed. We’d be bussed up to some wind-wept fields on the edge of the Derbyshire moors and, after digging out the dried on mud and grass from between the studs on our boots, expected to somehow know the rules of rugby or cricket and get on with that until it was time for a freezing communal shower in what seemed like a converted WW2 bunker, before being bussed back.
If we were lucky it was cross-country running. Lucky because this sport was largely unsupervised and there was a ramshackle corrugated iron cafe near the mill pond half way round. So if nobody was stationed at the far end of the course with a clipboard (and we’d survived the mysterious air-rifler who took pot shots at us on occasions), we could get a cup of hot-chocolate and doss about for half an hour or so, then set off back and try to make ourselves look exhausted on arrival at the changing rooms.
I’d probably be thinking about trekking round town the next day to “do” the record shops, an occupation which usually meant doing very little beyond just pestering assistants in various shops to stick an album on in the listening booth. I may have spotted Deep Purple In Rock on display, but it would be a couple of weeks before I got to hear Black Night on the radio, and start to make the connections between this, snatches of sessions I’d heard, and the coverage in the music papers. I could hardly miss this front page advert (above) which appeared on the NME dated June 13th (it’s been on the site before but what the heck). The single bought, it was the flip of Speed King which had me saving up for In Rock, an awesome track the likes of which I’d never heard before.  It had everything you’d want in a rock record, and I played the single to death until I’d got enough to buy the album. Until then b-sides had usually been a bit of a disappointment, but here was one which was far better than the hit.
45 years have now passed since the single and album were released, indeed it’s been 20 years since I was involved in the remaster of the record, checking through old tapes on a mission my teenage self could only have dreamed about.
It may just be a piece of ancient history to the five musicians who created it, but for those of us it has given such listening pleasure to over the years it remains 35 minutes in time which we continue to marvel at.
I’ll treat myself to a couple of tracks to mark the occasion before I get on with the rest of the day. It does occur to me that the old cafe we bunked off to is still there, and the sun is out, so when I’ve finished filling in, scanning and emailing off some boring “supplier contract forms” (which apparently enable me to supply stuff even though I’ve already signed a contract to supply it, but without which I might well not get paid) I might sneak off for a cuppa there afterwards and ponder on where the time went.

I’m not sure if it’s a coincidence but Geoff Barton has done a piece on Mk 2 vs Mk 3 on the Classic Rock magazine site this week, which lauds In Rock – thanks to Tim Summers and Tom Dixon for spotting this.

one made earlier

May 11, 2015

Deep Purple In Rock sleeve match

Why? Well The Grauniad newspaper online reran a picture story about finding famous album covers on Google ‘street view’ (sort of like that Sleeveface craze from a few years back) some time ago (see link below).  Anyway, Tim Summers decided they’d missed one crucial shot so had a go himself which we thought was worthy of reposting.  Anything to cheer the other 70% of us up in the aftermath of last thursday…

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/gallery/2014/apr/07/classic-album-covers-in-google-street-view-in-pictures

Wait (ing is over) For The Ricochet

January 31, 2014

Deep Purple early Mk 2

The Deep Purple – Wait For The Ricochet book has now shipped. Last Friday was signing day. Stephen and Simon spent several hours slowly and carefully going through boxes of the book. Shipping out for discounted pre-ordered copies began on Saturday and has carried on ever since, with the last couple of boxes going to the post-office today. So hopefully everyone who ordered direct before publication date will have their signed copy any time, well ahead of it being available anywhere else (it may take a couple of extra days to reach some of the more distant destinations – apart from the UK the book has gone to places as far afield as America, Canada, Europe, Russia, Malaysia, Australia, New Zealand and China.) The book is also with the distributors so they will be getting it out to shops and other online outlets in due course.
A big thanks to everyone who pre-ordered as it helped give the project some extra assurance, and also to people who contributed in whatever way to the content. Any new orders will be dealt with next week.
I have to say Easy On The Eye books (check their site for more information and ordering details) and their printers have done a bang up job, the book looks and feels great, and visually it’s just so jammed packed with material it’s hard to know where to start. The DTB office now has the lingering smell of real litho ink (which took Simon back to his days working at a printers,) and he’s asked for the weekend off to recover having worked out that he’d shifted 200kgs of orders single-handed over the week.
Another little teaser of a competition for people; the early live shot of IG in Mk 2 above was taken at a venue in the north of England with Deep Purple as the support act. Can you tell us the link between this venue and another famous British rock band who made it famous? No prizes for this one, as the answer is actually in the book – if you look carefully…  (and if anyone can source a set of those wonderful 50s lampshades for DTB towers do get in touch.)

What’s Goin’ On Here?

November 26, 2013

Deep Purple Blizen 1969 BlackmoreYou know how it is, book all proofed, checked and off to the printers, and then you take a second look at one of the last photographs which went in and… gulp; is Blackmore really using non-Marshall amps and speakers at an early show? Is the chapter covering his gear already needing a rewrite?
We had a low res scan of a great photo of Deep Purple at Blizen jazz festival in 1969, a very early Mk 2 shot which was quite important to the book. The photographer was asking a lot of money for us to use the image and wasn’t even sure if he wanted it in the book at all (as he was working on a book of his rock material from the sixties), so sorting it out took months.  We got there in the end, the high resolution version came winging through and was swopped over, but not before several hours spent cleaning up 40 year old dust specks (as you do). Generally this sort of work is done at some stupid size enlargement on screen to make sure nobody sees the restoration when it appears at normal size in the book. It’s fiddly work but I quite enjoy it.  That was until I realised the name on the amps clearly was NOT that of Marshall.  I could just make out the letters Dav…  This prompted a hasty round-robin to a few fans to see if anyone else could work out what was going on.
Deep Purple Blizen 1969 BlackmoreMy brother came back fairly quickly to say these were actually Italian speakers and amps made by Davoli, quite popular in Europe in the late sixties (as well as being collectable today; the amp has a really nice red fascia design). Others suggestions were that maybe Ritchie just had to borrow stuff as it was a multi-artist two day festival, which seemed reasonable. It was left to Tonny Steenhagen to restore sanity, by suggesting I check the old Bilzen video (which makes a change from him wearily having to point out I’ve spelt the festival name wrongly! And I must admit I’d not watched it for some years).  The Davoli amps and speakers were indeed there, but as part of the back-line for another band (see snap below).  The photographer had snapped Deep Purple with Blackmore near the front of the stage, so the foreshortening had made it look like they were his amps. The trusty Marshalls were there as always. Phew.
Hopefully we’ll get an actual delivery date for the book in the next few days, and can also point out that it’s been expanded in page count to incorporate extra material and photos. The publishers also have several more page previews on their site at easy on the eye books.

Blackmore meets Johnny Hallyday?

November 6, 2013

Ritchie Blackmore album sleeveHere’s a weird one from the files of Darker Than Blue; Blackmore in full strobe mode on the front of a French album of rock and roll cover versions! Read more about this on the site.

designer surfaces

November 4, 2013

Deep Purple In RockAmazingly the guy who did the artwork job for Deep Purple In Rock has surfaced. Colin is 93 but still going strong, and his son got in touch with me recently following a feature  which appeared on the ST33 album sleeve design blog. Colin also worked on a couple of the band’s other sleeves, via his friendship with manager John Coletta.  Needless to say I have emailed him some questions via his son and hope to find out more soon.  In the meantime, you can read the story of the In Rock design on ST33.

The Wait For The Ricochet book is now finally expected later this month.

Waiting for the ricochet…

September 26, 2013

is nearly over. Easy On The Eye have updated their site with news of the Wait For The Ricochet book, which has been delayed a little due to a few of technical glitches at the proofing stage. They are expecting delivery during late October (or possibly early November). The good news is that towards the end of the project the printers suggested the book could have extra pages due to the way they would be setting it up on the press, so it’s now even longer. Which means there was room after all for the story about our beloved ex-Labour PM ratting out fellow pupils for wagging off to see the band in 1970! And more photographs.
A big thank you to everyone who has pre-ordered, and who will get their copies straight off the press. DTB have just taken delivery of boxes of special packaging to make sure it arrives in pristine condition.
The book can still be pre-ordered (either via the publishers or DTB Online store).
Ritchie Blackmore guitar strobe sequence 1970