Archive for the ‘Deep Purple In Rock’ Category

In Rock Hard

July 6, 2020

The latest issue of Planet Rock magazine (21) manages to get in a few Deep Purple releases as part of a bit Top 100 Live Albums feature. Mike Galway has spotted (in reverse order!) 50 – On Stage, full page with nice pic of Ritchie and Japanese ticket. 47 – Made In Europe.  30 – Live in the Heart of the City, full page picture of Coverdale. And best of all at No. 1 – Made In Japan with a four page feature.
Mike says it’s “a nice feature which somebody has obviously put some thought into – which makes a nice change”. The magazine is a tie in with Planet Rock radio but has never really found a niche that marks it out from other rock magazines, and this will be it’s final issue.

Rock Hard 398.jpg

Meanwhile in Germany Rock Hard magazine finally bow to common sense and go with what we’re told is their first Deep Purple cover feature (it’s taken them nearly 400 issues!), though they didn’t go very far for the cover shot, one of the most used of all time. Inside according to John Tucker they have a 12 page feature, interviews with Steve Morse and Ian Paice, a piece on books about the band, what looks like a retrospective and a section on ‘In Rock’ to mark the anniversary.

I’m afraid I had to look up the cover word, only to discover it has it’s own flipping wikipedia page! From un- +‎ kaputt +‎ -bar. The word – which means indestructable – “was used first in 1990 in an advertising campaign. It intentionally violates the grammar rules by using the suffix -bar with the adjective kaputt despite of the fact that this suffix is only used to build adjectives from verbs (e.g. unkaputtmachbar). This made the word sound somewhat funny with the purpose of drawing attention.” So now we know!

Rock in the charts

June 21, 2020

LP charts June 21 1970 Deep Purple

Contrived headlines of our times. But Fifty years ago today (June 21st) Deep Purple In Rock belted up to the number 4 slot in the British album charts. They had properly arrived.  And while the album didn’t climb any higher here, it was still in the top ten come the new year. And what was preventing it from getting higher? Well Bridge Over Troubled Water was just unstoppable with 33 weeks at number one alone, a figure it is hard to even get your head round these days. It had even usurped the Let It Be album from getting back to number one. Then Paul McCartney’s solo album which again was just firmly lodged at the top for weeks on end.  But interesting to see a top ten comprised such important and interesting albums, and great to see Deep Purple right there amongst them.

And while it isn’t brand new, here’s another nice In Rock themed cover, this time from one of those Japanese potted black and white paperback (and pocket sized) histories which appear quite regularly. It’s published by Kawade if you want to try and root it out online (we could not find an ISBN).  While we’re on it, if you remember a flashy Deep Purple Collection book issued in Japan many years ago, the author and owner of the collection is proposing an updated edition. As a collector myself it was an interesting book, and every release was illustrated (though the photos were very small) but equally it was far from complete (as few collections are!). More news on this when we have it.

Japan In Rock paperback

 

24 with a bullet

June 14, 2020

deep-purple-in-rock-review

Fifty years ago today (June 14th 1970), Deep Purple In Rock entered the British album charts at 24. It was a significant moment. Although the Concerto had just sneaked in, peaking at 26 in January (and in doing so becoming their first ever top thirty album), this time sales were indicating to EMI that In Rock was set to do much better. The band had really done the groundwork on the road over the previous ten months and were continuing to support the album with a series of one-nighters here and in Germany during June. The single Black Night, released on the same day as the album, was however still struggling but that would eventually change.
People are still marking the anniversary in nice ways. The picture above is from a site called Now Spinning, and one of their editors Phil Aston has written fondly about his memories of buying the album on cassette back in 1973…

https://nowspinning.co.uk/deep-purple-in-rock-memories-of-a-classic-album/

Another nice personal feature which I enjoyed is the one below written by Nedim Hassan:

https://www.getintothis.co.uk/2020/06/deep-purple-in-rock-the-hard-rock-classic-nears-its-50th-anniversary/

More In Rock magazine covers are turning up; German magazine MINT (Magazin Für Vinyl-Kultur), issue No.36, 05/20, has used the anniversary as an excuse to devote 40 (!) pages to the band albeit ranging far and wide rather than focusing on In Rock, including an album guide, a feature on Machine Head, Ian Gillan discussing Vanilla Fudge, Steve Morse on The Well-Tempered Synthesizer, Ian Paice talking about Gene Krupa, a feature on the third album cover art by Hieronymus Bosch, etc! And an extra tick for their designer who sneaked in the issue number using Burn imagery. Anyhow, Lutz Reinert who alerted us to it, says we can get it direct by mail order (€8 inside or €9 outside Germany including postage and package): https://www.mintmag.de/

MINT Nr.36, 05.20

SHVL777

June 5, 2020

 

I’d not forgotten that we have rolled around to an important anniversary, honest. Just shocked to realise we’d got the date wrong for all these years…! Seriously. It’s not so easy to find something new to say, particularly as I’ve been raving about this album for fifty years now myself. Many of us have studied the ins and outs of the band’s formation and marvelled at the moments of serendipity which led to these five guys being in the same room at Hanwell together where they started to create this amazing piece of work. But I still feel having had it there on the shelf as part of my music collection all that time has been such a privilege really.
Sometimes you play a bit of vintage music and it sounds fifty years old. It’s not a problem, you appreciate the track in the context of the times and go with it. I never feel that this album sounds old – it just feels of the moment whenever I play it. It’s a massively difficult trick to pull this off, and doesn’t happen very often in the world of rock.
So I was casting around for something to mark the occasion and thought it would just be good to throw in the opening screams of noise which herald Hard Lovin’ Man to deafen everyone who logged on today. Then I looked for a way to do this and found the audio to listen to while I had my thinking cap on. Now many are probably like me and ignore or avoid the below the line comments which people idly chuck into the white space below each YouTube clip. It can be a bit of a graveyard of futile ramblings at times but I started looking and then got stuck into it.
There it all was, people just coming together and sharing their admiration for this one track, together with many of the reasons why it continues to rattle round our heads so memorably. So I pottered through and just red penned some of my favourites. I didn’t save names as most people don’t use them when posting anyway. You’ll know who you are. I know who some of you are. But we share this wonderful appreciation together.
Thank you Ritchie Blackmore, Ian Gillan, Ian Paice and Roger Glover. And Jon Lord, don’t think you’re getting away. Imperious.

PS The fact that at the end it went right into an ad for funeral plans was a bit of a back to the real world with a jolt moment. Be ready with the mute button in case.

Simon • Darker Than Blue

In Rock is the best rock album ever made in my opinion. Hard Lovin’ Man is a killer track! Awesome!

Those organ notes are – brutal.

I’m quite sure that what Jon does to that poor Hammond is illegal in at least 30 States.

Ian Paice carries this track at 100 mph throughout. Brilliant drumming!

In Rock has to be one of my all time fav albums…beginning to end. And this tune was the baddest of em all.

15 years ahead of its time. This song is a slasher.

To me, this is and will always be Purple’s best album. Better even than Machine Head and Made In Japan. And that’s saying something.

In Rock was the very first proper heavy rock album before 1970; all the big names turned out albums with rock interlaced with blues tracks [but] Deep Purple threw down the gauntlet with this all killer no filler album. The first album I ever bought and played the grooves off it.

And it took until December 2015 to get them into the hall of fame?

One of the greatest rock songs ever.

Everything is said here, the rest is a footnote.

The first speed metal song in history – wonderful.

Absolutely unparalleled, beyond compare, nothing before or since has ever been anywhere near as good as these guys.

No comments. Deep Purple.

This is an example of the GENRE created by Mark 2 with this monumental album. A genre which only they ever played. Mark 2 was both the greatest and saddest story in rock. For the short time they were together these five were quite simply the greatest group of pure rock musicians ever.

Two words… Jon Lord.

I bloody love this track. Ritchie’s constant guitar work is outstanding.

This is beyond words.

And on for 300 more comments in a similar vein…. and you can of course read more in the book which tells the story of the album, Wait For The Ricochet.

SONY DSC

Down a place

January 7, 2019

child-in-time-holland-45

Hands up if you remember the Dutch arm of EMI issuing Child In Time as an A- sided 7″ single? The sleeve (shown here from Simon’s collection)) was decorated with Dutch charts to show the track had been Number One in the Veronica Top 100 for three years since 1972. Amazingly the equivalent chart for 2018 shows the track is still high in the annual listing, although it has slipped one place from last year, down from 5 to 6.  The tracks keeping it down were Bohemian Rhapsody and Hotel California at 1 and 2 again, then Piano Man by Billy Joel (how strange is that!), Stairway To Heaven and Wish You Were Here.  The chart also picks up Smoke On The Water (at 119) but you need to go to 1380 to find the next entry, Black Night.  I’ve no idea how these are compiled any more, clearly not physical sales, but however they do so it’s good to see the track is still well liked by one of European neighbours. Thanks to Tonny Steenhagen who sent me the info.  The story of the track is told in great detail in the Deep Purple In Rock history Wait For The Ricochet (just in case you haven’t bought the book yet!).  And of course 2019 marks the 50th Anniversary of DPMk 2.  I did try to hire Hanwell for an event but sadly they cannot allow any more than 200 people in the function room, and there is no guarantee that the rehearsal rooms we’d wish to see will not be occupied by judo classes!

Einem Meisterwerk

June 15, 2018

Deep-Purple-In-Rock-German-sales

Just to let people know that there will be a German edition of the Deep Purple book Wait For The Ricochet later this year. Published by Hannibal, it will look very similar to the original, with the same illustrations and format.  If anyone is interested, the title can be pre-ordered already from the publisher’s own site.  Hard to believe but the album is 48 years old this very month, and was of course a massive seller in Germany where it topped their album charts for weeks. If you do not have this book yet, the English edition is back in stock through the publisher’s own shop.  And their follow-up devoted to Machine Head and titled Fire In The Sky is now not far away.

The publishers would like to thank Lutz and Andreas for their help in making this German edition possible.

47th anniversary reprint!

June 5, 2017

Deep Purple In Rock

What were you doing on June 5th forty-seven years ago?  Me I was probably trying to dodge flying board rubbers in double english (the teacher had this habit of lobbing them at high velocity in the vague direction of anyone he thought wasn’t paying attention…)
Some however were lucky enough to be in town picking up Deep Purple In Rock, released that day (or perhaps the single Black Night, issued at the same time.)
I was reminded of this only because the reprint of the book Deep Purple – Wait For The Ricochet is at last back in stock at the publishers.  Everyone who pre-ordered the reprint has had their copy shipped, but if you missed it first time round, now is your chance (but don’t dilly dally as a third of the stock has apparently shipped already.)

The book basically covers the entire build up from the first days of Mk 2 through the recording sessions for the first Mk 2 studio album and then the In Rock tour, an intense two year period, researched in remarkable detail, chock full of photos and memorabilia. From Jon Lord’s mum defending her lad in the Melody Maker, to Roger Glover’s hints for dying crushed velvet trousers green. From the location of the gig where Gillan was auditioned, to Ritchie shopping for strobe lights. From the In Rock engineer’s matter of fact description of Ritchie recording the guitar solo for Child In Time,  to Ian Gillan Black Night contemporary press reviewexplaining the need for tight trousers to sing the vocals, it’s all here.  What’s more there is a discount on the retail price which is extended for the next two weeks if you order through the publisher’s shop. The links below will give you more information and page visuals.
And if you already have the book, celebrate like I am by playing a cut or two off the album later today (to get Liar Liar out of your brain if nothing else!).

link to shop
link to publisher’s pages about the book
reviews of the first edition

In Rock book cover, Wait For The Ricochet.

 

 

The Black Sun went down

October 5, 2015

Deep Purple Roger Glover Guildford 1969

Don’t get too excited when we say this is a newly discovered clip of Deep Purple Mk 2, as it is very very short, silent, monochrome and blurry.  But it is always tantilising to see early scenes of this line-up live, just a few weeks after the Royal Albert Hall do.
It’s part of a short 16mm film made to record events at the University of Surrey’s Rag Week, which includes fund raising goodies such as a Mile Of Pennies, girls in bikinis jumping in buckets of water for money (and they reckon the ice bucket challenge was new!), and then on to the week’s big concert on November 28th in Guildford, Deep Purple, supported by Bridget St John, Horse and Quintessence, with the Black Sun Light Show.  Tickets 16/- (or a quid on the door).
The Uni archivists say the soundtrack has been lost and needless to say any unused footage is missing.
Thanks to Dave Browne for spotting it.

Smells like…

September 16, 2015

“Do you know the bewitching power of the poppy? A precious flower, with invaluable vitality. Its bloom conceals a vibrant sensuality, revealing the essence of women, their most captivating facet.”

And here’s me thinking it was used to make Class A drugs.  Still, this new commercial for Kenzo perfume does have one thing going for it;  Deep Purple’s original Child In Time as the backing music.  And it sounds amazing even pulled out of context, testament to what an incredible track it always was.  The manufacturers have also posted a lengthy “making of” video in which they discuss everything from the design of the bottle to the CGI.  But don’t mention the music once.

Our man being sprayed in the face in John Lewis: Tim Summers

SHVL777@45

June 5, 2015

Deep Purple In Rock NME June 13 1970

Unlike famous musicians, who we expect to be able to recall what they did on every day of their career (because we have to know!), I haven’t got the foggiest notion what I was up to on Friday June 5th 1970, beyond getting through another day at school.  Friday was usually sports all afternoon, an occupation I loathed. We’d be bussed up to some wind-wept fields on the edge of the Derbyshire moors and, after digging out the dried on mud and grass from between the studs on our boots, expected to somehow know the rules of rugby or cricket and get on with that until it was time for a freezing communal shower in what seemed like a converted WW2 bunker, before being bussed back.
If we were lucky it was cross-country running. Lucky because this sport was largely unsupervised and there was a ramshackle corrugated iron cafe near the mill pond half way round. So if nobody was stationed at the far end of the course with a clipboard (and we’d survived the mysterious air-rifler who took pot shots at us on occasions), we could get a cup of hot-chocolate and doss about for half an hour or so, then set off back and try to make ourselves look exhausted on arrival at the changing rooms.
I’d probably be thinking about trekking round town the next day to “do” the record shops, an occupation which usually meant doing very little beyond just pestering assistants in various shops to stick an album on in the listening booth. I may have spotted Deep Purple In Rock on display, but it would be a couple of weeks before I got to hear Black Night on the radio, and start to make the connections between this, snatches of sessions I’d heard, and the coverage in the music papers. I could hardly miss this front page advert (above) which appeared on the NME dated June 13th (it’s been on the site before but what the heck). The single bought, it was the flip of Speed King which had me saving up for In Rock, an awesome track the likes of which I’d never heard before.  It had everything you’d want in a rock record, and I played the single to death until I’d got enough to buy the album. Until then b-sides had usually been a bit of a disappointment, but here was one which was far better than the hit.
45 years have now passed since the single and album were released, indeed it’s been 20 years since I was involved in the remaster of the record, checking through old tapes on a mission my teenage self could only have dreamed about.
It may just be a piece of ancient history to the five musicians who created it, but for those of us it has given such listening pleasure to over the years it remains 35 minutes in time which we continue to marvel at.
I’ll treat myself to a couple of tracks to mark the occasion before I get on with the rest of the day. It does occur to me that the old cafe we bunked off to is still there, and the sun is out, so when I’ve finished filling in, scanning and emailing off some boring “supplier contract forms” (which apparently enable me to supply stuff even though I’ve already signed a contract to supply it, but without which I might well not get paid) I might sneak off for a cuppa there afterwards and ponder on where the time went.

I’m not sure if it’s a coincidence but Geoff Barton has done a piece on Mk 2 vs Mk 3 on the Classic Rock magazine site this week, which lauds In Rock – thanks to Tim Summers and Tom Dixon for spotting this.