Posts Tagged ‘Deep Purple In Rock’

In Rock Hard

July 6, 2020

The latest issue of Planet Rock magazine (21) manages to get in a few Deep Purple releases as part of a bit Top 100 Live Albums feature. Mike Galway has spotted (in reverse order!) 50 – On Stage, full page with nice pic of Ritchie and Japanese ticket. 47 – Made In Europe.  30 – Live in the Heart of the City, full page picture of Coverdale. And best of all at No. 1 – Made In Japan with a four page feature.
Mike says it’s “a nice feature which somebody has obviously put some thought into – which makes a nice change”. The magazine is a tie in with Planet Rock radio but has never really found a niche that marks it out from other rock magazines, and this will be it’s final issue.

Rock Hard 398.jpg

Meanwhile in Germany Rock Hard magazine finally bow to common sense and go with what we’re told is their first Deep Purple cover feature (it’s taken them nearly 400 issues!), though they didn’t go very far for the cover shot, one of the most used of all time. Inside according to John Tucker they have a 12 page feature, interviews with Steve Morse and Ian Paice, a piece on books about the band, what looks like a retrospective and a section on ‘In Rock’ to mark the anniversary.

I’m afraid I had to look up the cover word, only to discover it has it’s own flipping wikipedia page! From un- +‎ kaputt +‎ -bar. The word – which means indestructable – “was used first in 1990 in an advertising campaign. It intentionally violates the grammar rules by using the suffix -bar with the adjective kaputt despite of the fact that this suffix is only used to build adjectives from verbs (e.g. unkaputtmachbar). This made the word sound somewhat funny with the purpose of drawing attention.” So now we know!

Rock in the charts

June 21, 2020

LP charts June 21 1970 Deep Purple

Contrived headlines of our times. But Fifty years ago today (June 21st) Deep Purple In Rock belted up to the number 4 slot in the British album charts. They had properly arrived.  And while the album didn’t climb any higher here, it was still in the top ten come the new year. And what was preventing it from getting higher? Well Bridge Over Troubled Water was just unstoppable with 33 weeks at number one alone, a figure it is hard to even get your head round these days. It had even usurped the Let It Be album from getting back to number one. Then Paul McCartney’s solo album which again was just firmly lodged at the top for weeks on end.  But interesting to see a top ten comprised such important and interesting albums, and great to see Deep Purple right there amongst them.

And while it isn’t brand new, here’s another nice In Rock themed cover, this time from one of those Japanese potted black and white paperback (and pocket sized) histories which appear quite regularly. It’s published by Kawade if you want to try and root it out online (we could not find an ISBN).  While we’re on it, if you remember a flashy Deep Purple Collection book issued in Japan many years ago, the author and owner of the collection is proposing an updated edition. As a collector myself it was an interesting book, and every release was illustrated (though the photos were very small) but equally it was far from complete (as few collections are!). More news on this when we have it.

Japan In Rock paperback

 

24 with a bullet

June 14, 2020

deep-purple-in-rock-review

Fifty years ago today (June 14th 1970), Deep Purple In Rock entered the British album charts at 24. It was a significant moment. Although the Concerto had just sneaked in, peaking at 26 in January (and in doing so becoming their first ever top thirty album), this time sales were indicating to EMI that In Rock was set to do much better. The band had really done the groundwork on the road over the previous ten months and were continuing to support the album with a series of one-nighters here and in Germany during June. The single Black Night, released on the same day as the album, was however still struggling but that would eventually change.
People are still marking the anniversary in nice ways. The picture above is from a site called Now Spinning, and one of their editors Phil Aston has written fondly about his memories of buying the album on cassette back in 1973…

https://nowspinning.co.uk/deep-purple-in-rock-memories-of-a-classic-album/

Another nice personal feature which I enjoyed is the one below written by Nedim Hassan:

https://www.getintothis.co.uk/2020/06/deep-purple-in-rock-the-hard-rock-classic-nears-its-50th-anniversary/

More In Rock magazine covers are turning up; German magazine MINT (Magazin Für Vinyl-Kultur), issue No.36, 05/20, has used the anniversary as an excuse to devote 40 (!) pages to the band albeit ranging far and wide rather than focusing on In Rock, including an album guide, a feature on Machine Head, Ian Gillan discussing Vanilla Fudge, Steve Morse on The Well-Tempered Synthesizer, Ian Paice talking about Gene Krupa, a feature on the third album cover art by Hieronymus Bosch, etc! And an extra tick for their designer who sneaked in the issue number using Burn imagery. Anyhow, Lutz Reinert who alerted us to it, says we can get it direct by mail order (€8 inside or €9 outside Germany including postage and package): https://www.mintmag.de/

MINT Nr.36, 05.20

SHVL777

June 5, 2020

 

I’d not forgotten that we have rolled around to an important anniversary, honest. Just shocked to realise we’d got the date wrong for all these years…! Seriously. It’s not so easy to find something new to say, particularly as I’ve been raving about this album for fifty years now myself. Many of us have studied the ins and outs of the band’s formation and marvelled at the moments of serendipity which led to these five guys being in the same room at Hanwell together where they started to create this amazing piece of work. But I still feel having had it there on the shelf as part of my music collection all that time has been such a privilege really.
Sometimes you play a bit of vintage music and it sounds fifty years old. It’s not a problem, you appreciate the track in the context of the times and go with it. I never feel that this album sounds old – it just feels of the moment whenever I play it. It’s a massively difficult trick to pull this off, and doesn’t happen very often in the world of rock.
So I was casting around for something to mark the occasion and thought it would just be good to throw in the opening screams of noise which herald Hard Lovin’ Man to deafen everyone who logged on today. Then I looked for a way to do this and found the audio to listen to while I had my thinking cap on. Now many are probably like me and ignore or avoid the below the line comments which people idly chuck into the white space below each YouTube clip. It can be a bit of a graveyard of futile ramblings at times but I started looking and then got stuck into it.
There it all was, people just coming together and sharing their admiration for this one track, together with many of the reasons why it continues to rattle round our heads so memorably. So I pottered through and just red penned some of my favourites. I didn’t save names as most people don’t use them when posting anyway. You’ll know who you are. I know who some of you are. But we share this wonderful appreciation together.
Thank you Ritchie Blackmore, Ian Gillan, Ian Paice and Roger Glover. And Jon Lord, don’t think you’re getting away. Imperious.

PS The fact that at the end it went right into an ad for funeral plans was a bit of a back to the real world with a jolt moment. Be ready with the mute button in case.

Simon • Darker Than Blue

In Rock is the best rock album ever made in my opinion. Hard Lovin’ Man is a killer track! Awesome!

Those organ notes are – brutal.

I’m quite sure that what Jon does to that poor Hammond is illegal in at least 30 States.

Ian Paice carries this track at 100 mph throughout. Brilliant drumming!

In Rock has to be one of my all time fav albums…beginning to end. And this tune was the baddest of em all.

15 years ahead of its time. This song is a slasher.

To me, this is and will always be Purple’s best album. Better even than Machine Head and Made In Japan. And that’s saying something.

In Rock was the very first proper heavy rock album before 1970; all the big names turned out albums with rock interlaced with blues tracks [but] Deep Purple threw down the gauntlet with this all killer no filler album. The first album I ever bought and played the grooves off it.

And it took until December 2015 to get them into the hall of fame?

One of the greatest rock songs ever.

Everything is said here, the rest is a footnote.

The first speed metal song in history – wonderful.

Absolutely unparalleled, beyond compare, nothing before or since has ever been anywhere near as good as these guys.

No comments. Deep Purple.

This is an example of the GENRE created by Mark 2 with this monumental album. A genre which only they ever played. Mark 2 was both the greatest and saddest story in rock. For the short time they were together these five were quite simply the greatest group of pure rock musicians ever.

Two words… Jon Lord.

I bloody love this track. Ritchie’s constant guitar work is outstanding.

This is beyond words.

And on for 300 more comments in a similar vein…. and you can of course read more in the book which tells the story of the album, Wait For The Ricochet.

SONY DSC

Little Richard

May 13, 2020

Little Richard Oasis Club 014 copy.jpg

So exactly why should we be marking the passing of Little Richard here?  Well, Deep Purple In Rock would not have been the same without Richard’s trail blazing contributions to rock’n roll for starters.  Speed King in particular owes even more, with Ian Gillan quoting lyrics from Little Richard classics throughout (to brilliant effect).  Deep Purple often featured manic versions of Lucille and Good Golly Miss Molly (the latter with keyboard work Richard himself would be proud of) as encores for chunks of Mk 2’s early career (check out the amazing version of the former on the BBC In Concert 1972 set in particular).  Cut during the mid-Fifties, these songs and many other Little Richard hits were instrumental in the development of the individual musicians growing up. Check out how closely Ritchie would reference the original guitar break in Lucille.  And we shouldn’t forget The Outlaws’s cover of Keep A Knockin’ which was based closely on Little Richard’s version (Zepp later nicked the 1957 drum intro), while Richard did also cut a track called Baby Face…

Our photo was taken in Manchester in 1964 when Richard played the famous Oasis Club to a packed and reverential crowd, backed by The Dakotas (courtesy Easy On The Eye Books).

Auto Repair

May 6, 2020

Speed King mug Bridlington.jpg

This tickled us seen by Simon in a dusty shop window over in Bridlington a couple of years ago.  It’s probably still there (the shop is just by the walk way at the top of the harbour).  A set of strange ‘Dad’ mugs with various faux adverts on the side and themed handles.  So this Speed King mug advertises an auto repair business with a scooter handle, the snooker hall one has balls…  well, we are in saucy seaside postcard territory here!  As Simon pointed out at the time, if it had just been the mug he might have parted with some of his holiday money, but not with the silly handle. And anyway as readers of the fab Deep Purple In Rock book will know, the song title was inspired by a chain of laundrettes Roger spotted in London,

The bus now waiting

March 26, 2019

Deep Purple are having a bit of a break from hurtling this year but have booked in some shows in Eastern Europe for December 2019. Sofia, Budapest, Klagenfurt and Ostrava (on the 4th) so far with more to follow.  Thanks to Tim Summers for the heads up.  Sorry, am I allowed to even write the word Europe any more?

klagenfurt bus.jpg

From your local newsagent

December 19, 2017

Planet Rock Deep Purple

Spotted the new issue of Planet Rock magazine lurking behind a newsagent’s counter in Chesterfield at the weekend with a familiar cover image; the In Rock sleeve (foldout and embossed no less!)  They only had one copy and it was reserved, but a nose about suggests a 15 page “epic” interview with the Messers Gillan, Glover and Paice amongst other things. The magazine is newish (I think this is issue 6), so not as well distributed as more established titles, but looks like it’s worth hunting down.  And it hasn’t taken them anything near as long as Classic Rock did to get them on the cover either!

Glenn has also blagged himself another cover story, the American magazine Bass Player dated jan 2018 but on shelves now. “The toughest man in rock” apparently! BCC also made the front of Interactive Guitar Number 53, but this is an online only magazine. Can you collect those? Will anyone want to look at real things in the future? Thanks to Stephen Clare for the info.

Bass Player Hughes

47th anniversary reprint!

June 5, 2017

Deep Purple In Rock

What were you doing on June 5th forty-seven years ago?  Me I was probably trying to dodge flying board rubbers in double english (the teacher had this habit of lobbing them at high velocity in the vague direction of anyone he thought wasn’t paying attention…)
Some however were lucky enough to be in town picking up Deep Purple In Rock, released that day (or perhaps the single Black Night, issued at the same time.)
I was reminded of this only because the reprint of the book Deep Purple – Wait For The Ricochet is at last back in stock at the publishers.  Everyone who pre-ordered the reprint has had their copy shipped, but if you missed it first time round, now is your chance (but don’t dilly dally as a third of the stock has apparently shipped already.)

The book basically covers the entire build up from the first days of Mk 2 through the recording sessions for the first Mk 2 studio album and then the In Rock tour, an intense two year period, researched in remarkable detail, chock full of photos and memorabilia. From Jon Lord’s mum defending her lad in the Melody Maker, to Roger Glover’s hints for dying crushed velvet trousers green. From the location of the gig where Gillan was auditioned, to Ritchie shopping for strobe lights. From the In Rock engineer’s matter of fact description of Ritchie recording the guitar solo for Child In Time,  to Ian Gillan Black Night contemporary press reviewexplaining the need for tight trousers to sing the vocals, it’s all here.  What’s more there is a discount on the retail price which is extended for the next two weeks if you order through the publisher’s shop. The links below will give you more information and page visuals.
And if you already have the book, celebrate like I am by playing a cut or two off the album later today (to get Liar Liar out of your brain if nothing else!).

link to shop
link to publisher’s pages about the book
reviews of the first edition

In Rock book cover, Wait For The Ricochet.

 

 

Still waiting for the ricochet

December 19, 2013

The publishers of Wait For The Ricochet have not been able to get this shipped into their warehouse in time for DTB to post out before the December holiday break.  It will arrive with the book distributors sometime over the next few days, and we will in turn arrange to have our stock shipped up to our office as soon as it on their stock lists. DTB customers will still get their copies before anyone else, but I do apologise to anyone who was hoping for this in their stocking.