Posts Tagged ‘Easy On The Eye’

one voice to rule them all

April 29, 2015

Graham Bonnet biographySimon has just finished editing author Steve Wright’s Graham Bonnet text and this has now gone out for proofing (hello Tom and John!).  “As I came to Graham mainly through the Rainbow connection (and having seen him live a couple of times in recent years) one thing which did strike me was just how many guitarists Graham has worked with over the last 35 years. How about this for a list? Ritchie Blackmore, Michael Schenker, Yngwie Malmsteen, Chris Impelliteri, Steve Vai, Taz Taylor, Ray Fenwick, Micky Moody, Jan Akkerman, Mario Parga, Slash, Bob Kulick, Danny Johnson, Viv Campbell, Dario Mollo, Axel Rudi Pell, Uli Jon Roth, and Gary Moore!  I wonder if any other singer can match that? But I have to say reading it through has inspired me to go looking for a few bits of his later catalogue which I missed at the time, and to me that’s always the sign of a good book.”  Anyhow, the book is now into the design stage so anyone interested who has yet to join the mailing list for this is urged to do so, and get early details of any pre-launch offers, etc.

Machine Head shout out

December 9, 2014

Deep Purple rolling stones mobileIt being that time of year (Christmas? No, much more important – the anniversary of the Machine Head sessions! 43 years ago this week) I’ve been reminded to mention the ‘looking back’ feature we did some time ago which some will have missed. A sort of glance at events day by day in December 1971.  It’s been updated a little, we now know for example that Jon drove down in his E-Type Jag (nice), but fun to look through and think back.

We are working on the Machine Head book (Fire In The Sky), which will follow the In Rock title early in the new year. More details of that on the publisher’s website (where you can also join a newsletter service to keep up to date on progress). In connection with this, if there is anyone out there who knows people who worked at The Grand Hotel or the other venues the band used / stayed in, please try and put us in touch.  If you worked for the Stones Mobile crew back then (in the office perhaps) we’d love to ask some questions. We have found a few people who went to the actual Zappa show too and witnessed the fire, but it would be interesting to get more reports.

 

The Skyliners

July 15, 2014

A few days away from the laptop and we get back to find the site awash with speculation about our mystery guitar player from an earlier posting here. So without further ado…
Skegness-advertDavid Coverdale was indeed in a band called The Skyliners from November 1968 for a few months (until they changed their name to The Government). The Skyliners we showed is a different (and older) outfit, which featured Graham Bonnet on guitar and vocals (and there were a number of people who did guess correctly), Bill Gardner on drums, Alan Vickers on brass, with band leader Peter Tomlinson on keyboards. Incredibly Graham was still at school when he joined them in 1963, and stayed with the outfit for around 18 months, playing hotels, clubs, Butlin’s, and coffee bars in Skegness and Lincolnshire. “We did all the songs you could imagine. ‘Take Five’, ‘San Francisco’, ‘Go Away Little Girl’, Sinatra tunes, Tony Bennett etc. and all the awful pop tunes that were around at the time. It was all mum’s and dad’s type songs. Lots of instrumentals, Joe Loss type things and jazz stuff.” Graham finally moved on to form a more contemporary pop group in 1964. The Skyliner’s photo (check here if you missed it) came from the forthcoming Graham Bonnet Biography, written by Steve Wright – who used to run Graham’s fanzine Under The Bonnet which older DTB people will remember I’m sure. As Steve says, it is not intended to be a dirt digging exercise, he’s more interested in properly documenting Graham’s career, but the singer has been very open and honest about his ups and downs in the rock business in a series of interviews over the last few years. Due out towards the end of this year, I’ve really enjoyed reading the story as it does provide a real insight into Graham’s background and upbringing. It will be published by Easy On The Eye books, and you can read more on their website. Format will be similar to the recent Wait for The Ricochet title, with lots of memorabilia and pics, and there should be an opportunity to get a limited version signed by GB as well. The publishers have opened an information service for anyone who would like to be kept up to date and get early news of publication, and also allowed us to reprint their publicity information on DTB in the book section.
Thanks to Steve and Easy On The Eye Books for the advance information. Steve has collected a lot of material for the book but if any DTB people have photographs or memorabilia which might be suitable, send me an email and I’ll put you in touch.

Graham Bonnet The Man Behind The Shades biography. Easy On The Eye Books

Waiting for the ricochet…

September 26, 2013

is nearly over. Easy On The Eye have updated their site with news of the Wait For The Ricochet book, which has been delayed a little due to a few of technical glitches at the proofing stage. They are expecting delivery during late October (or possibly early November). The good news is that towards the end of the project the printers suggested the book could have extra pages due to the way they would be setting it up on the press, so it’s now even longer. Which means there was room after all for the story about our beloved ex-Labour PM ratting out fellow pupils for wagging off to see the band in 1970! And more photographs.
A big thank you to everyone who has pre-ordered, and who will get their copies straight off the press. DTB have just taken delivery of boxes of special packaging to make sure it arrives in pristine condition.
The book can still be pre-ordered (either via the publishers or DTB Online store).
Ritchie Blackmore guitar strobe sequence 1970

43 this week

June 3, 2013
Deep Purple In Rock release June 1970

In Rock out June 5th

I’ve been listening to Deep Purple In Rock now for 43 years. Not continuously I hasten to add, with an album this venerable it’s important not to over play it. So I like to save it up for a treat when I’m really in the right frame of mind. But even if I’m not blasting it out as often as I used to, I still know In Rock well enough for it to remain one of my all-time favourite hard rock albums by any band. Fireball might just pip it to the post, but without In Rock there would not have been any Fireball, so maybe it ought to stand as their finest hour (or thirty plus minutes).
Some of the band (indeed many musicians) get rather dismissive about people as they see it ‘obsessing’ on moments from the past and as with any creative work, the creators generally move on.
Personally I really enjoy going back into time, whether it’s standing in the Tudor kitchens at Haddon Hall and seeing the soot marks left by candles nailed into the crude wood paneling 400 years ago by some over-worked cook, or wondering who penned the busy press release which Deep Purple’s publicists issued in the second week of May 1970. They’re both equally ephemeral moments.
You would think that a press sheet announcing the date for the release of Deep Purple In Rock would lead off with just that. Not a bit of it.  Instead the sheet talked about an impressive American record deal, the delayed release there of The Concerto, details of the follow-up work by Jon, etc., etc. Only then did it let slip (almost in a ‘by the way’ sort of fashion) that the band’s new studio album would be released three weeks hence, before carrying on with details of live dates in Germany and UK one-nighters.
Some of the music papers copied the information more or less in full, others just cherry-picked the news they thought would interest their readership. Deep Purple after all were still not a huge name, and given that for many readers The Concerto was perhaps their only point of reference for the band, maybe whoever had written the press release had been wise to lead off with that.
I like to think of the people reading it who felt a sense of anticipation, perhaps having seen the band live or heard them in session, and were keen to hear the first studio album from the new band. Planning a trip down to their record shop on June 5th, or maybe placing a pre-order (as a lot of people used to do in those days, paying a deposit over the counter). They would not be disappointed. Wait For The Ricochet.