Posts Tagged ‘Plumpton’

Chris Squire

June 29, 2015
Chris Squire, Manchester Palace Theatre, 1975

Chris Squire with Yes, Manchester Palace Theatre. photo : Simon Robinson

As someone is always quick to point out if I so much as dare to mention politics in a passing comment, this is first and foremost a Deep Purple site.  But we are all a product of the times we lived through and the music we grew up with, and I am sure I’m not the only one here who will feel sad to learn of the death of Yes bass player Chris Squire.  With money always in short supply as a teenager, a fair proportion went on live music. My and I brother were fortunate enough to get a couple of the last tickets for the Yes Tales From Topographic Oceans tour, our first experience of the band live.  It was one of those show you will remember forever, and we sat transfixed by the whole evening – despite not owning the album (something we soon rectified, it remains one of my favourite Yes albums to this day).  And Yes certainly shared a similar history and timeline to Deep Purple, all the musicians being a product of the mid-sixties beat boom. Co-founded by Chris Squire, Yes also emerged from an early line-up into what many regard a their classic incarnation, and hit their stride at much the same time as Purple too.  The paths of the two bands even crossed on the live circuit in the early days (check out the advert below), different styles of music for certain, but in the late Sixties and early Seventies there was very much a progressive or underground scene to which both bands were equally valid (though whether Yes felt much of that spirit after the events at Plumpton in 1970 when they were supposed to follow Purple, despite Blackmore setting the stage on fire, I’m not sure!).  Yes underwent far more extreme changes of line-up and direction than Deep Purple over the years for sure (something I have learned more about while working on the publication of a book about Yes in recent months), but that bass (and those jackets) remained throughout.

Yes, Deep Purple, Lyceum London 1969