Posts Tagged ‘roger glover’

Unveiling

July 9, 2018

Montreux 4th July 2018 – Plaque Unveiling Ceremony at the Former Grand Hotel.

 

Ian Gillan by the plaque

Tim Summers has managed to pen us a few words about the event itself, for more see the two posts below…

With the proceedings due to kick off at 11 am, we hopped off the train at Territet with about 25 minutes to go and strolled across the street to the building itself. We struggled to recognise it at first due to it being covered in scaffolding; one reason for having the plaque located round at the unobstructed rear entrance – actually this made sense as this was where the mobile studio was parked – and it meant that we could hear the speeches (and not get run over!) shielded from the relatively busy road to the front.
As we arrived tables of food and drinks were being set up opposite the rear entrance, and a copy of Machine Head stood on a podium to the side, with a picture of the mobile studio parked there some 40-odd years previously on the wall at the other side. The good folk of Montreux made us feel very welcome, and we chatted with just the occasional craning of the neck to peer down the road to see if there was any sign of any Purple people arriving. Roger had promised to attend together with “whoever else he could drag along”. As 11 am approached, a sleek looking people carrier was sighted at the bottom of the slope; it drove up to the car park barrier and the doors opened – Roger was first out, followed by Ian Gillan and Paicey. They ambled up the road in the style of a royal walkabout, stopping to shake hands and chat with people in the assembled throng (of probably around 100 people).
Once at the top they went inside the foyer (which was open) and we followed them in – it was kind of awe-inspiring to be in such an historically significant building. They were happy to chat, pose for photos and sign anything thrust in front of them, and after a little while we ventured back out into the sunshine for the unveiling. There were speeches, including one from Paicey, who said that this was the first time he’d been back to the building since he finished work on the Machine Head album. He actually explained in terms I could understand the necessity of all that climbing out of windows/across balconies business too.
The plaque is a nice thing – not the sort of blue metal affair I was imagining, but rather a laser-etched glass creation, with a (surprisingly effective) button to back-illuminate it on command. As well as including a contemporary picture of the band from the time of recording the album, the plaque details the significance of the album and building too. I spoke to its Italian creator, and he said that he wanted to make something special for a band as important as Deep Purple.
Montreux itself is quite an amazing place, and it really comes alive for the annual music festival. Later in the day Roger did a sort of Q&A about the significance of it all, the fire and the recording of the album, and we spotted him again later just walking down the street (probably returning from the soundcheck for that night’s gig). Paicey summed up the sort of intertwined nature of the band and place in his closing remarks about the recording of Machine Head here: “Looking back on our career, probably one of the the most important 3 weeks of our lives”. –Tim Summers (thanks to Keith Sharp and Ian Edwards for the photographs).

Below, Keith’s picture of the plaque in situ. The text is a bit clunky but you should have seen it before we re-wrote it! It was supposed to have the album title and name off the sleeve too, not sure where those went…  But a very swish item which does the band proud.

Montreux Plaque 2018

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Roger on bass

April 11, 2018

Roger Glover is joining his old mate Pete York’s Rock and Blues Circus for a tour of Germany in November/December 2018. Dates are on our diary page.
The other musicians are: Pete York, Miller Anderson, Zoot Money and Albie Donnelly.

Thanks to Luts Reinert for the info and the flyer below.

Pete Yorks ...ticklin 'da' groove flyer.png

Butterfly Ball

March 19, 2018

Another CD edition of Roger Glover’s Butterfly Ball is due, a 3CD set no less. Depending on how you catalogue them this is about the sixth or seventh. It has the original album, demos (which were on an earlier release but there may be some new ones), and the US radio interview, which came out on Connoisseur years in 1999 (the 25th Anniversary Collectors Edition Digitally Remastered Enhanced CD as the label insisted the cover say!). Disc 3 on this new one? Sadly not the live audio of the show, but a facsimile CD of the old EP. Still if you don’t have the album then it saves a hunt, and while the overall concept seems a bit strange these days there are some good tracks on there, and Ronnie Dio was outstanding. Thanks to Tom Dixon and others.

Butterfly Ball Connoisseur.jpg

 

More from your local newsagent

February 2, 2018

Anyone still short of that Planet Rock magazine Deep Purple special we mentioned a couple of weeks back, the Waitrose supermarket chain in the UK have just put it in the shelves as a promotion this week so we could pick a copy up at last. Quite a good read all in all, and a few nice pics.

Hopefully easier to find than Planet Rock, the new issue of Record Collector out this week has a big article entitled The Untold Story of Made In Japan, although those who have read it suggest The Retold Story might be more appropriate. However quite a few nice photos, some in colour, so worth checking out even if the regulation Mk 2 group photo is looking a bit over-used.  I can’t resist a decent Debbie Harry photo, so that will probably swing it for me! Thanks to Stephen Clare and others for the heads up.  

Best heading though which turned up this week while I was trying to find out when Roger Glover first brought his Rickenbaker back on stage during the reunion (he can’t remember, if you can confirm do tell! We think it was 1993):

Roger Glover Explained – everything.explained.today
everything.explained.today/Roger_Glover
What is Roger Glover?

From your local newsagent

December 19, 2017

Planet Rock Deep Purple

Spotted the new issue of Planet Rock magazine lurking behind a newsagent’s counter in Chesterfield at the weekend with a familiar cover image; the In Rock sleeve (foldout and embossed no less!)  They only had one copy and it was reserved, but a nose about suggests a 15 page “epic” interview with the Messers Gillan, Glover and Paice amongst other things. The magazine is newish (I think this is issue 6), so not as well distributed as more established titles, but looks like it’s worth hunting down.  And it hasn’t taken them anything near as long as Classic Rock did to get them on the cover either!

Glenn has also blagged himself another cover story, the American magazine Bass Player dated jan 2018 but on shelves now. “The toughest man in rock” apparently! BCC also made the front of Interactive Guitar Number 53, but this is an online only magazine. Can you collect those? Will anyone want to look at real things in the future? Thanks to Stephen Clare for the info.

Bass Player Hughes

Guest stars

December 1, 2017

We missed this during all the DP tour excitement; it’s a Bowie cover tour masterminded by his former pianist Vin Diesel, sorry, Mike Garson. Gillian Glover is one of the musicians involved and persuaded Roger to join in on a version of Jean Genie just at the Brum concert. Oh and a few bars of Black Night! Thanks to Stephen Clare for the flyer.

Surprising

November 19, 2017

Roger Glover, Manchester Arena, November 2017. Photo Vince Chong

Some early DTB jottings on the shows so far [warning – UK set list spoiler at the end.]
Well Manchester for us certainly served to make the fast fading BBC show [incidentally the red button version has now been re-edited to around 15 minutes with an Ian Gillan interview between songs… but better audio] seem even more subdued and muted, and it was a treat to properly experience the group again. Those people who were able to resist watching the TV slot so as not to spoil the actual shows probably made the right call. Every tour we worry it’ll disappoint, but so far they’ve managed to largely over-ride those concerns. There is no doubt Paice’s illness brought the group down for a time and, back on European soil after the disappointment of the later US shows, with a revamped set, they do seem to have bounced back, and as Ian Gillan reportedly said at the first show in Birmingham (that’s IN Birmingham, for all the lost souls who ended up at the Little Mix show by mistake) they’re hoping to eek this Farewell Tour out a little longer.
And on the form they showed at Manchester it would be hard to begrudge them. The opening triple blast is designed to set the scene and by the fourth number in they were really beginning to motor. Curiously it was the double reunion blast of Perfect Strangers and Knocking At Your Back Door which really seemed to hit the nail for me; expected highlight Birds Of prey appeared to falter a touch, though the hard core suggest it was more epic at Birmingham.
In short we thoroughly enjoyed the show even from our eerie up in the gods, and from what people say it was even more in your face on the arena floor. And while it wasn’t a total sell out, it was pretty packed – this mob would have filled the old Ardwick Apollo twice over. So while I used to merrily moan about them not doing the smaller venues, these days we all need a bit more give and take. And the show was also clear proof that doing new tracks isn’t necessarily the kiss of death here; most of the audience knew what was what and just confirms that there is life after 1972 (and it doesn’t have to be Contact Lost!).

Deep Purple

My only real disappointment was the band could not find a moment to thank the staff; after Birds of Prey perhaps? I’m no fan of arenas and avoid them as much as possible, often skipping bands rather than use them. But it takes organisation to run a place like this smoothly, and as we wandered around outside and inside before the show, we couldn’t help think many of the staff here would have been on duty back in May and have to cope with that memory every time they go to work. We had a number of issues finding the right entrance to collect our tickets, and at the security where our friend Vince, who’d just flow in from Canada, kept setting off the alarm, which we eventually realised was steel in his yomping boots! Every member of staff we approached was polite and helpful. Credit where it’s due.
And another star docked for not doing Hip Boots. It’s a bee. And it’s in my bonnet. I’ll just have to crank up the album again, and isn’t that the best response to a show?
Hello to everyone who said hello and good to catch up with so many people (and a big thanks for the photos from Manchester supplied by Vince Chong.) Special thanks to Roger Glover who gave up two hours of his afternoon to be pushed hard on Machine Head (John Humphrey style) for the upcoming book; some things we couldn’t get to the bottom of, other stories emerged which more than made up!
Simon Robinson

Steve Morse 5527

Excellent show (at Birmingham), though they did footle about a bit too much during the encore. Gillan sounded fine when pushed through a massive PA – he gets by on studio recordings, and live in the flesh. Live recordings with him sound… not so good (BBC In concert the night before).
It was all a bit of an adventure for us, we booked hotels at the NEC, and had a look around the complex during the afternoon of the show. Not many Purple fans in evidence though, oddly, quite a few girls with glittery make-up and pink hair extensions. And crowds of people in costume arriving for Comic Con the next day (middle-aged Wonder Woman is not a sight I’ll easily forget…)
At around 5.30 I wandered into the Genting Arena box-office to ask about timings for the evening. A very helpful girl said: “Little Mix will be on stage at 8.30.” Can’t remember my exact reply, after a shocked silence it was something stupid like “Oh… what about Deep Purple?”
Turns out they were at Birmingham Arena, 45 minutes away, somewhere in the city centre. I’d never heard of the venue before. The Arena is NOT well signposted, even when you’re standing outside it on the steps. Apparently it was the Barclaycard Arena until recently, until some clever tit decided it would be less confusing to call it “Arena Birmingham.”
Dave Browne

If it’s any consolation David, we would have done just the same (gone to the NEC Arena that is, not ogled aged female superhero lookalikes!) Seriously, we just go round Birmingham these days, the signage and over complex road system is so inept it’s not worth arguing with them any more.

Ian Gillan, Manchester Arena, November 2017. Photo Vince Chong

Set my expectations (at Manchester) sensibly beforehand (caught a bit of the red button show on TV that morning, so that helped set the dial).
But what a surprise! I thought they were pretty good all-in-all, rather enjoyed it from our vantage point and, much to my surprise, really good sound.
Both me and Mrs. Judd thought the new stuff sounded pretty good live and a big thumbs up to the band for sticking so much into this show from the last two CDs. IG came across more animated and sounding a bit better (to my old ears) than on the beeb, with plenty of between-songs ramblings.
I thought Steve M. took a little while to properly warm up but was playing well later in the set. Where does Rog. get his stamina from? He had to be the most energetic of the lot of them with two or three bass solo type spots, and it is hard to believe Ian P. ever had his health scare of a wee while back, yes his playing isn’t quite as exuberant as yesteryear (and no solo spot), but very sharp.
Don is still all blizzard of notes at the keys (do wish he’d try a bit of less-is-more sometimes) but I thought the organ tone he used was a tad better than at times in the past (not so overly bright but maybe that was just the feed we were getting stage-left).
The massive stage-wide screen behind the band and two side screens where used pretty well (unlike the beeb who seemed to be pointing cameras at the wrong band member quite a lot, here you could see the important detail up there, if you wanted to).
Always enjoy a bit of keyboard/guitar lick trading, we had to wait until Hush for that but still quite fun.
So if that’s my lot for live DP (who knows when/if they’ll be around this neck of the woods again) then, for me, that wasn’t a bad gig to end with. My post-gig smile even survived the seemingly endless wait to get out of the car park.
Peter Judd

Travel tip; never use the M/c Arena car park for a gig. We put ours in the Lowry car park five mins walk away; a tenner for the whole day; security so tight, cars so posh nobody would give our crate a second glance, and no queues out!

Time for Bedlam / Fireball / Bloodsucker / All I Got Is You / Uncommon Man / The Surprising / Lazy / Birds of Prey / Knocking at Your Back Door / Keyboard Solo / Perfect Strangers / Space Truckin’ / Smoke on the Water – Hush / Black Night

Ian Paice, Manchester Arena, November 2017. Photo Vince Chong

Roger, track by track

April 11, 2017

Interesting to read what the story is behind each of the new album tracks, courtesy of Classic Rock. You can read their full feature here (http://teamrock.com/feature/2017-04-09/roger-glovers-track-by-track-guide-to-deep-purples-infinite) but thought DTB viewers may find it useful. Meanwhile, our Facebook page has got lots of people reacting – mostly positively – to the new album.

Time For Bedlam

At the end of a jam that sounds promising, I’ll ask if anyone in the band has a working title for the song. Time For Bedlam was one of mine — it’s a fun play on words — and occasionally a working title will present itself as a proper title. It was even considered as an album title at one point, but we were talked out of it.
When we write the songs, we steep ourselves in the atmosphere of the song and try and figure out what it’s about. And this one sounded vicious. Especially the keyboard solo. It was bedlam.

Hip Boots

I don’t know how true it is, but years and years ago I heard that the origin of the word ‘hip’ comes from a southern American phrase that says, “you can bury me up to my knees in shit, but I’ve got my hip boots on.” And I’ve had this in the back of my brain for 20 years. It’s a song about freedom, and about being above it all.
I like that fact that it goes into 3/4 time. To me, that’s a real kicker.

All I Got Is You

It comes from a phrase Ian Paice uses. You’ll be telling him something, and he’ll be looking at you with a blank look on his face, and finally he’ll say, “Look at it this way. You’ve got me: all I’ve got is you!” Ian’s sense of humour is based on insults.
There’s no forethought about where an album might be going, but we knew we didn’t want to write love songs. We didn’t want to write about fast cars and girls. We should write lyrics for our age. We were looking for stories, and for words we could get our teeth into. And this is a funny song about a relationship gone bad.

One Night In Vegas

This has a really cool groove, going down that Freddie King 16s feel, which we love. It’s one of my favourite tracks.
Don Airey told me this story about a band who played Las Vegas, and the bass player went out and got really drunk. He woke up the next morning with a hangover, unable to remember anything, with a girl he didn’t know lying next to him. He asked who she was, and she said, “I’m your wife!” And they’re still together after 30 years!

Get Me Outta Here

I was sitting at home in my studio messing around with Pro Tools, and took four bars of Paicey’s intro to Bodyline [from 2013’s Now What?!] and slowed it right down. It became almost a reggae tempo, and it sounded great. The drums get thicker, but Ian’s swing feel still comes through. I just loved it, so I wrote a riff over it, and it just resonated with me. The song just flowed.
Maybe I was thinking about The Animals We Gotta Get Out Of This Place, maybe I was thinking about the state of the world we’re in. You just want to run away from it.

The Surprising

Steve started played this pretty chord sequence, and it sounded great. We all joined in a we jammed around it. I gave it the working title of “The Surprising Mr Morse” because it was a surprising thing he played.
They’re Ian Gillan’s words, and I suppose it’s about temptation, but they’re ambiguous, and I like ambiguous words. People can read want they want into it. People will anyway, even when you spell it out. Smoke On The Water is completely literal, and yet a DJ once asked me if we really set fire to an island. You can’t stop people putting their own meaning to a lyric.

Johnny’s Band

Johnny’s Band was almost a pop song. Steve came up with the idea, and not all the band liked it at first: Ian Paice thought it was a bit flippant, but Ian Gillan loved it, and eventually we decided to do it. We knew what the meter of the song was going to be, and realised it needed something really strong over the chorus to make it work.
I was thinking about VH1’s Behind The Music, and that every band’s story is the same. They start with nothing, then they get some success, then they get huge success, then drink and drugs and women destroy them, then they end up suing each other, then 20 years later they get back together again because they realise it was the best time they ever had. Johnny’s Band is the story of every band. It’s a universal story. But it’s not about Purple! There’s a reference to Louie Louie in the guitar solo that places it firmly in the 60s.

On Top Of The World

It’s based on one of Gillan’s true stories, and it happened to him a long time ago, I think in Kuala Lumpar. He had one of those nights, and ended up on top of a building where all the hookers and street dancers lived. He was telling us this story, and Bob [producer Bob Ezrin] wanted to fit the story into the backing track, but it’s too long, and by the end of the afternoon they’d agreed that it wasn’t working.
I had an idea, and condensed the story into a shorter form, but it was still too long for a song. We were just on the point of abandoning it, and I thought, “why don’t we just do something at the end?” And that’s how it came about.

Birds Of Prey

We stated working on a riff I had in the rehearsal room, and after a brief arrangement we did a first take, and I still love that take. We just had so much fun with it because it was so hard and heavy. On the recorded version the ending goes around two or three times, but on the jam we had it goes on 10 or 12 times. We just couldn’t stop playing it. Steve and Don swap solos, and there’s a lovely sense of freedom about it.
People say that they want peace, but it occurred to me that we’ll never have peace. The world has never had peace, and it never will, because the natural state of human beings is conflict. It’s wishful thinking: we’re always going to be at odds with something, and I wanted to say something about that. My first image was 9/11 — hence Birds Of Prey — but it goes way beyond that.
One of the things I really like about the song is that it doesn’t repeat itself. It’s not verse-chorus-verse-chorus-solo. It takes you on a journey.

Roadhouse Blues

This was Paicey’s idea. On Now What?! we didn’t Jerry Lee Lewis’s It’ll Be Me [it featured on the Deluxe Editions] purely for fun, and Bob suggested we pick another old track. We spent about a minute thinking: Bo Diddley? Bob Dylan?
Then Paicey related this story about working with tribute bands when he’s off the road, to keep his hand in and to keep fit. They were doing Black Night, and at the end the singer went into Roadhouse Blues. So he suggested it, and Bob said, “that’s it! Let’s do it!” It took less than half an hour, and it’s all live: vocals, harmonica, the lot.

Frock folk fest

December 2, 2016

Roger Glover turned up on bass with a local Swiss folk band a couple of weeks ago, and was snapped for the local paper.

Roger Glover folk band

 

Meet you in the foyer

July 18, 2016

Hotel foyers are the traditional place to meet up when you’re staying in one.  However, you never really expect to bump into Roger Glover, and if you do it wouldn’t normally be in the foyer of the Grand Hotel in Montreux…  nevertheless here we are.  It’s a long story and as you might expect there was a little more to this than mere chance, and we will file a full report in a couple of days when we’ve had time to take it all in.

Roger Glover and Simon Robinson in the Grand Hotel Montreux

To put the location in context, this room is where Ritchie disappeared to from time to time to record some of his guitar work on the album (the black bag marks the spot).

I notice sandals are clearly back in fashion too. I have been asked by the owner to explain that this building is not accessible at any time except to residents.

flight-case